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FOODPICKER: Newsletter: Nutrition
Nutrition Q&A Newsletter:


This week's question for your nutrition blog:

From: Shirley S. (e-mail not disclosed for privacy)
To: diabetes@foodpicker.org
Date: 02/15/2010
Subject: sugar substitute question

What is the best sugar substitute to use for baking and daily use for diabetics?

Please respond to the above question on your blog by Sunday at midnight.  We will review all blogs and post several responses in our next newsletter!

Example: Christine's Blog

Do you know someone with diabetes?  They can send their questions to: diabetes@foodpicker.org


Last week's question:

From: Sally R. (e-mail not disclosed for privacy)
To: diabetes@foodpicker.org
Date: 01/24/2010
Subject: is "NoSalt" safe

I have type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure.  Some one suggested I try "Original No Salt" which is Sodium-free instead of salt.  Is it a safe alternative for my use?

Below are a number of responses to the above question:

Rosie Jardina, RD (Registered Dietitian)
Answer: The majority of sodium free salt products replace the sodium chloride with potassium chloride. I would talk to your doctor about your potassium levels to see... (click for entire response)

Elissa Basham, Dietetic Intern
Watching your sodium intake is very important for those with high blood pressure. Using a salt substitute is one option, however you should consider several factors first. Salt substitutes such as “Original No Salt” contain potassium-chloride, instead of sodium chloride. If you have any sort of kidney problems... (click for entire response)

Hanna Newman, Nutrition Student
Answer: Eliminating salt from your diet is a good start to curing your high blood pressure. “Original No Salt” is a safe alternative for you to use. Here are two easy ways you can reduce your sodium... (click for entire response)

Jackie Hempel, Master's of Nutrition & Dietetic Intern
With diabetes, the vascular system, kidneys and heart are already at risk of sustaining damage. We know that too much sodium can lead to high blood pressure which can also damage these organs. Its important for people with diabetes... (click for entire response)

Mandy Seay, Dietetic Intern
According to the American Diabetes Association, as many as 2 out of 3 adults with diabetes also have high blood pressure. While it may seem like the right choice to use salt substitutes, which have no sodium or salt in them, these could actually be dangerous for diabetics with kidney complications... (click for entire response)

Doretta Ho, MS, RD (Registered Dietitian)
Answer: The ingredients in NoSalt Original contain no salt or sodium. Sometimes the hypertension individual may be asked to limit his/her salt and sodium in the diet. Sodium draws fluid into the blood... (click for entire response)


Have you created your blog yet?

If you have not yet created a professional nutrition-based blog, you can easily do so at:

WordPress.com (free & takes 5 minutes to setup)
OR
Blogger.com (free & takes 5 minutes to setup)

Each week we will e-mail out a question that can be covered in your blog. 

We will feature the best blogs in upcoming newsletters!


We'd like to recognize the following FOODPICKER.org Contributors!

FOODPICKER.org Contributors:  April McLain, Kelley Swanson, Stephanie Gant


What trends in nutrition do you see in 2010?

Please e-mail Christine (nutrition@foodpicker.org) with your ideas, thoughts, and suggestions for upcoming Nutrition Editor newsletters.

Thanks for your efforts!

Christine Carlson, MS, RD, BC-ADM, CDE
Founder, FOODPICKER.org


FOODPICKER® is a program designed to help people with diabetes make better food choices.  Our hope is that people consider the foods they consume and how they can burn them off with exercise for good health.  We embrace the guidelines put forth by the American Diabetes Association as well as the American Dietetic & American Heart Associations.  This website is completely free and brought to you by volunteers in the health care field.


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